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Reserva de la Tierra

Pruning at vineyards | Reserva de la Tierra

ITS PRUNING SEASON

Winter pruning is one of the most important tasks carried out in the vineyard and it determines many aspects of the future harvest.

Once the leaves fall from the vines in autumn and the cold sets in, the plant enters a state of rest and dormant activity. A winter slumber that will last until February. It is during this time that the winter pruning should be done. This involves removing branches and twigs from the vine in order to improve the production and quality of the grapes.

We prioritize quality over quantity.

Grapevines are similar to the lianas that grow on trees and use them as a support; although we are not used to seeing grapevines like this, if left to grow in the wild they could reach up to 30 meters in length. Among other things, pruning serves to keep the vines’ growth and shape constant, while also improving their health and vigour, and regulating their yield.

What is the best time for pruning?

Many winegrowers are unsure of the best time to prune their vines. Many people follow their own set of rules, such as moon phases, early pruning (November), late pruning (February–March)… But in general, it should be done during the vines’ dormant period, before the bud break begins.

Pruning should be done with a lot of care, taking into account that not all plants are alike and knowing what we want to express through their fruit

Pruning is an aggressive act for the plant, this is why it should be done during its least active phase. Various external factors need to be observed, such as the climate — pruning shouldn’t be done on an overcast or rainy day in order to avoid the spreading of mould. Other factors that have to be taken into account include ground conditions, the grape varieties and the age of the vines.

Over the following months, the vine will continue its growth cycle, passing through the various stages of bleeding, bud break, flowering, fruit set, veraison and harvesting.

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